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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OE AGRICULTURE 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics 
Division of Cotton Marketing 




serve 




Release - 11:00 a.m. C.S.T. 



September 9, 1933- 



COTTON GRADE AND STAPLE REPORTS FOR 



Umb er 7 



Weekly grade and staple reports for the States in the Atlanta area 
show an improvement in grades for cotton from Alabama and Georgia and 
little change in grades for South Carolina and Florida. Ginnings in North 
Carolina and Virginia have been inadequate for representative ' samples upon 
which to base reports. 



the past week was White Strict Middling and better as compared with 25 per 
cent for the previous week. Eor Georgia White Strict Middling and better 
grades represented 30 per cent of the cotton classed the past week against 
19 per cent the previous week. 

The percentages of White Strict Middling and better for the present 
season to date are as follows: Alabama 32 per cent, Georgia J>6 per cent, 
Florida 2k per cent, and South Carolina J>1 T? eT cent. Over 50 per cent 
of the cotton for these States has been White Middling. Each of these 
States shows for the White Grades below Middling and for Spotted and Tinged 
grades a combined percentage of about 13 per cent. The Piedmont district 
of Georgia has produced a -relatively large amount of Spotted and Tinged 
cotton, 21 per cent of the amount ginned to ,date. . 

Reports for Alabama, Georgia, and Florida continue to show a 
preponderance of 7/S inch staple" wi ^''percentages of this length in these 
states being 81 per cent, 57 P®r cent, and 62 per cent, respectively. The 
amount shorter than 7/g inch is very small for Alabama, Georgia, and Florida; 
and the report for South Carolina shows none shorter than 7/g inch. The 
percentage of cotton having staple length one inch and longer is 6 per cent 



» O « © 6 * <* 0 * « 

p4 JM - 

The report for Alabama shows that 40 per cent of the cotton classed 



for Alabama, .15 per cent for Georgia, 3 per cent for Florida, and 72 

per cent for South Carolina. South Carolina thus takes a tremendous 

lead as regards the States in the Atlanta area in the production of 

longer staple lengths. 

The percentage of cotton having a staple of 1 inch and longer 

has varied significantly in Georgia in the different districts this 

0 . a s * r 0 t <9- <* « 

.... .!| > ■ ■• ■ 

season to date. The samples from the Sandy Coastal Plains district 
of south Georgia have shown a percentage of 12 per cent for 1 inch 
and "better. The Sand and Clay Hills district in southwest Georgia 
shows 21 per cent 1 inch and better. The samples from the Piedmont 
area of G e orgia thus far have shown a percentage of kj, per cent 1 inch 
and better. Other States also show striking differences in staple 
length between the various districts. 



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/ 7 

' UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT 07 AGRICULTURE 

Bureau of Agricultural Economics 
Division of Cotton Marketing 




*fgia, 

Release - 11:00 a.m. C.S.T. ^ ^^Ege^ a^fer l6, 1933. 

* . 

COTTON GRADE AND STAPLE REPORTS FOR WEEK ENDING SEPTEMBER lk 

Weekly grade and staple rejjorts for cotton issued in Atlanta to-day 
"by the United States Department of Agriculture show lower grades ginned in 
Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina for the past week. The report for 
Florida shows no significant changes in grades. The report for North 
Carolina, the first report this season for this State, reflects the customary 
good grades- for early ginnings. 

The lowering of average grades for Georgia, Alabama, and South 
Carolina was principally the result of greatly increased proportions of 
Spotted and. Yellow Tinged grades during the past week* Spotted and Tinged 
grades combined represented over 2h per cent for Georgia for the past week, 
over 18 per cent for Alabama, and over 6 per cent for South Carolina. For 
the previous week the precentages of Spotted and Tinged cotton ranged from 
2 per cent to 7 P er cent for these States. A. surprisingly large amount 
of the ginnings for last week from the Piedmont section of Georgia, about 
5** per cent, was either Spotted or- Tinged according to the report. It may 
be said that spotted cotton is the first stage in discoloration but such :i :-t 
designation does not necessarily indicate low value as the specific grade 
is also a governing factor. 

The grade of the total crop to date for each State continues to be 
high, with percentages of HiThite Middling and better being about &k per cent 
for G G orgia, Alabama, and South Carolina, 88" per cent for Florida, and 
92 per cent for North Carolina. 

The length of "staple for Alabama for the past week represented a 
considerable improvement over the previous week as evidenced by the fact 



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that the proportion of 1 inch and longer was almost doubled that of the 
previous week. The Piedmont and Blue Ridge district in east central 
Alabama produced a much larger proportion of 1 inch and longer staple this 
season than any other district in Alabama. Likewise the Piedmont section 
of Georgia has produced the largest staple for Georgia. 

Among the States served by the Atlanta office, South Carolina shows 
the longest staple length, with 71 per cent 1 inch staple and longer, and 
there is not .any as yet reported with staple shorter than f/8 inch. North 
Carolina ranks second with ginnings thus far about 50 P 8r cent 1 inch and 
longer and 2 per cent shorter than Georgia has ginned to date 15 per 

cent 1 inch and longer with about 1 per cent less than f/S inch. Alabama, 
showing evidence of good improvement over previous years, has ginned to date 
about 9 per cent ! inch ad longer and less than 1 per cent shorter than ~f/& 
inch. The Florida report shows 2-5 per cent 1 inch and longer and about 
3 per cent shorter than ~[/% inch* 



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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics 
I^OOfc**^ Division of Cotton Marketing ^ St* 

Atlanta, Georgia^ 

Release - 11:00 a.m. C.S.T. September 23, 1933 

COTTON GRADE AND STAPLE REPORT FOR WEEK ENDING- SEPTEMBZR 21 
The weekly grada and staple reports issued to-day, by the Atlanta 
office of the United States Department of Agriculture, for Georgia, 
Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, and South. Carolina, show a continued 
increase in the proportion of Spotted and Tinged cotton for ginnings in 
these States. 

The percentages of White Middling and better for the season to 
date for the Atlanta area are still high, ranging from 72 percent In 
G e orgia to 86 percent in North Carolina. 

The reports also reveal a pronounced shortening of staple lengths. 
The percentage of cotton shorter than f/B inch staple shows a large 
increase this week over that of last week in each of the above-mentioned 
States. 

Georgia .- Cotton classed from Georgia gins this week shows J>% 
percent Spotted and Tinged against 24 percent last week with the Piedmont 
district showing 72 percent Spotted and Tinged for the week. However, for 
the season to date, for the entire State, 82 percent is White cotton with 
72 percent being White Middling and better. 

The staple of Georgia cotton declined this week, shi — nan ■ turn ounce 
ffjf 12 percent shorter than 7/8 inch against only 1 percent last week. Staple 
of 1 inch and longer is 5 percent this week against 17 percent last week. 
The percentages of the various staple lengths for the season to date are 
as follows: Shorter than 7/g inch is k percent; 7/8 inch,' 62 percent; 
15/l6 inch, 22 percent; and 1 inch and longer, 12 percent. 

Alabama. - Ginnings in Alabama show 31 percent Spotted and Tinged 
. for samples classed this week against 18 percent last week. White Middling 

and better for the season to date is still a relatively high amount, 78 percent. 



2 - 

A rather pkenominal increase in cotton of very short staple took 
place in Alabama this week with 22 percent shorter than 7/8 inch. This 
corresponds 'with only 2 percent last week. For the State to date 8 per- 
cent is shorter ..than f/S inch; J2 percent, 7/8 inch; 13 percent, 15/l6 
inch; and 7 percent, 1 inch and longer. 

South Carolina . - Spotted and Tinged cotton in South Carolina this 
week shows* a "big increase with 27 percent against 6 percent last week. 
However, 7^ percent to date is White Middling and better. 

Until this week South Carolina reports have not shown any staple 
shorter than 7/8 inch. This week 3 percent of the cotton is shorter than 
7/8 inch. |he proportion of 1 inch and longer for this week declined to 
32 percent against 70 percent, for last week. For the season to date about 
1 percent is shorter than 7/8 inch; 22 percent, inch, 2^ percent, 15/l6 
inch; and 53 percent, 1 inch and longer. 

North Carolina .- The report for North Carolina shows higher grades 
than for any other southeastern State with about J^percent White Middling 
and better. However, Spotted and Tinged cotton for this week shows a big 
inccease over last week, as has been the case with other States in this 
group. 

The staple lengths of North Carolina cotton are much shorter this 
week. Cotton shorter than 7/8 inch increased to about 8 percent against 
3 percent last week. Staple lengths of 1 inch and longer decreased to 19 
percent this week against h& percent last week. For the season to date 
6 percent is shorter than 7/8 inch; ho percent, 7/8 inch; 25 percent, 15/l6 
inch; and about 29 percent is 1 inch and longer. 

Florida.- G-innings in Florida show 6l percent Spotted and Tinged 
this week against 7 percent last week. However, to date 73 percent is 
White Middling and better. 

Staple lengths to date are 6 percent shorter than 7/8 inch; 81 per- 
cent, 7/8 inch; 11 percent, 15/l6 inch; and about 2 percent, 1 inch and 
longer. 

Virginia .- Ginni&gs have been insufficient upon which to base 
estimates. \ 



If 

(f UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Bureau of Agricultural Economics \k / 

^WCOTV© Division of Cotton Marketing ^^L$ oca n\t\$> 



Atlanta, Georgia, 

Release - 11:00 a.m.' C.S.T. ••" September 30, 1933. 

COTTON GRADE AND STAPLE REPORTS FOR WEEK ENDING SEPTEMBER 30 

The cotton ginned this week in the Southeastern States was lower in 
grade and shorter in staple length than for any previous week this season. 
Ginnings have revealed a progressive lowering of grade and shortening of 
staple length each week in Georgia, Alabama, v Florida, ' North Carolina, and 
South Carolina for the past three weeks or more. 

The combined proportions of Middling and better grades of White 
cotton ginned this week ranged from 35 percent Middling and better in 
Georgia to 67 percent in North Carolina, with South Carolina having about 
46 percent and Alabama about 56 percent. Last week the proportions of 
White Middling and better in these States ranged from 39 percent in Georgia 
to Sk percent in North Carolina. The previous week the range was from 
65 percent in Georgia to 9^ percent in North Carolina. 

The weekly reports have shown successive increases in the 
percentages of Spotted and Tinged cotton. Total ginnings to date show 
from 21 percent to 30 percent Spotted and Tinged cotton in Georgia, Alabama, 
Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. However, Middling 
and better grades of White cotton constitute from 63 percent to 75 percent 
of the total ginnings to date in each of these States. 

The progressive shortening of the staple lengths for the past few 
weeks has been just as pronounced as the lowering of the grades in the 
Southeastern States. In Georgia, Alabama, and Virginia, this week, over 
25 percent of the cotton ginned was shorter than f/8 inch, while the 
percentage- for South Carolina was about 5 percent and for North Carolina 



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about 10 percent. Last week the proportions of this short cotton were 
considerably smaller, and the previous week the amounts of cotton shorter 
than 7/8 inch were almost negligible. • • n 

South Carolina continues to lead the Southeastern States in staple, 
length of got ton ginned this season as is shown by the fact that percent 
of ginnings to date have staple length 1 inch and longer. Nortk Carolina 
is second with 21 percent 1 inch , and longer. Georgia and Alabama follow 
with 10 percent and 5 percent respectively, while Florida and Virginia each 
shows about 2 percent for 1 inch and longer to date. 

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